Maturity Models: Leanness, Agility, Competitiveness, and Collaboration

Maturity Models describe “degrees (or a pattern) of evolutionary stages (of essential elements) toward a goal”. A valuable maturity model is one that is “grounded in reality” and is context-aware but not context-sensitive. Being “grounded in reality” means that a maturity model is derived from more-empirical and less-anecdotal evidence. Being context-aware but not context-sensitive means that a maturity model is flexible such that it may readily be adorned to account for context but not so extremely sensitive as to be perverted. For example, perhaps founded on values & principles to foster emergent practices in a given context. Notice, that brittle would be “breakable” and rigid would be “inflexible”.

For example:

And unarguably, maturity models may be abused, just like anything else!


Agile Maturity Model (AMM)

0 – Dormant

1 – Speed: Focusing on being expeditious.

2 – Reactive: Focusing on acting relative to change from the perspective of the moment rather than a longer timeframe.

3 – Responsive: Focusing on acting relative to change from the perspective of the moment balanced with a longer timeframe.

With a few comments…


Lean Maturity Model (LMM)

0 – Dormant

1 – Value Stream: Focusing on eliminating waste.

2 – Flow & Pull: Focusing on limiting work-in-process.

3 – Optimization: Focusing on balancing demand against throughput (around value).


Competitiveness Maturity Model (CompMM)

0 – Dormant

1 – Technology-driven: Focusing on leveraging technology.

2 – Competitor-driven: Focusing on leveraging technology against competitors.

3 – Customer-driven or Sales-driven: Focusing on leveraging technology for customers and sales.

4 – Market-driven: Focusing on leveraging technology within the market.

5 – Market-driving: Focusing on Innovation and Advantage (Authentic Value).


Collaboration Maturity Model (CollMM)

0 – Dormant

1 – Communication: Focusing on interchanging content.

2 – Cooperation: Focusing on operating in parallel.

3 – Coordination: Focusing on regular/rhythmic rather than irregular/intermittent points in time for synchronization (coordinating parallel activities and interchanging content).

4 – Collaboration/Co-Creation: Focusing on purposeful contribution and confirmation using flow and pull. Contribution involves “investing” content (as in return-on-investment) based on another collaborator’s pull for content. Confirmation involves oversight and attaining a “return” on content (as in return-on-investment) based on one’s pull for content. Collaborators pull content from one another as needed, but don’t push content unnecessarily. Collaborators foster the flow of content as needed, but don’t batch content unnecessarily. Notice the paradigm shift from batch-and-push to flow-and-pull. Furthermore, collaborators are purposeful to a goal its objectives.

5 – Harmonization: Focusing on sustainable collaboration, of which, conflict and respectful resolution are an essential element.


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5 thoughts on “Maturity Models: Leanness, Agility, Competitiveness, and Collaboration

  1. Why do we need models?
    At one time this was a market differentiator for software development houses. There was a huge business model around training, certifying for CMM.

    Agile manifesto has a set of principles and that guide the continuous improvement process. I dont see a need to silo some organizations as level 0 and some as level 1 and so on…

    • Thanks for your comment… Ponder the questions re “models”… and why we need/use them all the time.

  2. Si Alhir,

    I am working on my Masters and looking at organizational decision-making through Agile principles. One of my interests is to try and identity the qualities of an Agile organization, and then map those through adoption: causality, if you will.

    The result looks a lot like a maturity model in the sense that an organization could use it to assess their level of adoption (authenticity and maturity). This is a work in progress, I would be interested your though thoughts. The model can be found at: http://openmasters.wordpress.com/agile-causality/

    Thank you,
    Patrick

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