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The Agile Model, Agility Model, and Manifesto for Agility

April 5, 2014

We live in a VUCA (volatility, uncertainty, complexity and ambiguity) world where we are challenged to be thriving on chaos in an age of discontinuity — where the past is plagued with incoherence & inconsistency, the present is plagued with chaos & ambiguity, and the future is plagued with unpredictability & uncertainty!

The Agile Model (Nick Horney and Tom O’Shea), our notion of Agility (The Agility Model) (Si Alhir), and The Manifesto for Agility are well aligned.

The Agile Model

The Agile Model focuses on “five characteristics needed for organizations to be capable of anticipating and responding to changing demands and adapting to new requirements . . . in real time.” That is, these critical capabilities across three enterprise domains (people, processes, and technology).

For the Agile Model, “pay attention to multiple dynamics” . . .

Anticipate Change: Interpret the potential impact of business turbulence and trends along with the implications to the enterprise. — Visioning, Sensing, and Monitoring

. . . “address issues” . . .

Generate Confidence: Create a culture of confidence and engagement with all stakeholders especially associates in effective and collaborative teams. — Connecting, Aligning, and Engaging

. . . “ensure there is a shared mindset . . . urgency for getting stuff done . . . positive accountability for doing so” . . .

Initiate Action: Provide the fuel and the systems to enable things to happen proactively and responsively, at all levels of the organization. — Bias for Action, Decision-Making capability, Collaborating

. . . “ensure openness” . . .

Liberate Thinking: Create the climate and conditions for fresh innovative solutions by empowering, encouraging, teaching and expecting others to be innovative. — Bias for Innovation, Focusing on Customers, and Idea Diversity

. . . “identify critical metrics for success . . . learn . . . to improve.”

Evaluate Results: Maintaining a strong focus and feedback system to continuously learn and improve from actions and changing dynamics. — Creating Expectations, Real time Feedback, Fact Based Measures

The Agile Model is holistic: “A comprehensive approach, meaning each driver is a vital force only when combined with the others. Applying one or two drivers in the absence of the others is an incomplete solution and will not result in Agility.”

The Agility Model

The Agility Model focuses on “Responsiveness and the ability to continuously Re-orient as we Observe, Orient, Decide, and Act. Agility is not merely about Speed . . . not merely about Reactiveness . . . is about Responsiveness!”
For the Agility Model, the essence of Agility is expressed using three aspects (as patterns).

The Results/Value-oriented pattern:

To maximize Value, foster Focus, leverage Feedback, and foster Balance. This must blend opportunity-seeking with stability-creating.

Focus on results, which can only be achieved by iterating and leveraging feedback within context such that people balance competing forces.

The Context-aware pattern:

To foster Focus, lead through collaboration (contribution and confirmation). This is opportunity-seeking.

Lead within context, which can only be achieved by collaborating with people such that they contribute to and confirm results; leadership is essential for focusing on results.

The People/Team-centric pattern:

To foster Balance, empower people. This is stability-creating.

Empower people who are able to achieve results within context; empowerment is essential for balancing competing forces.

These patterns are interdependent:

These patterns are interdependent. Without Leadership through Collaboration, we jeopardize Focus; without Empowerment, we jeopardize the ability to Balance; without Iterating, we jeopardize the degree of Feedback; and ultimately we jeopardize Value!

The Manifesto for Agility

The Manifesto for Agility emphasizes that “Agility is a value system (mindset) that emphasizes people, results, collaboration, and responsiveness.”

The Agile Model, Agility Model, and Manifesto for Agility

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The Agile Model and the Agility Model consider Agility or Responsiveness as emergent properties from the capabilities/drivers or aspects/patterns while the Manifesto for Agility identifies Responsiveness explicitly.

The Agile Model’s People domain relates to the Agility Model’s People pattern.

The Agile Model’s Anticipate Change capability relates to the Agility Model’s Context pattern. The Agility Model’s concept of leadership is congruent with the Agile Model’s concepts of potential impact, turbulence, trends, and implications.

The Agile Model’s Generate Confidence, Initiate Action, and Liberate Thinking capabilities relate to the Agility Model’s People pattern. The Agility Model’s concepts of empowerment is congruent with the Agile Model’s concepts of engagement, enablement, empowering, encouraging, and teaching.

The Agile Model’s Evaluate Results capability relates to the Agility Model’s Results patterns. The Agility Model’s concepts of focus and feedback are congruent with the Agile Model’s concepts of focus and feedback.

The Agile Model’s Generate Confidence, Initiate Action, and Liberate Thinking capabilities relate to the Agility Model’s patterns interdependence.

  • That is, “leadership through collaboration” (The Agility Model, Context-Results pattern interdependence) is essential to “create a culture of confidence and engagement” (The Agile Model, Generate Confidence).
  • That is, “empowerment . . . ability to balance” (The Agility Model, People-Results pattern interdependence) is essential to “create the climate and conditions for fresh innovative solutions” (The Agile Model, Liberate Thinking).
  • That is, “iterating . . . feedback” (The Agility Model, Results pattern interdependence on iterating for feedback) is essential to “provide the fuel and the systems to enable things to happen” (The Agile Model, Initiate Acton).

Fundamentally, Agility is realized by

  • anticipating change, generating confidence, initiating action, liberating thinking, and evaluating results; or by
  • fostering focus by leading through collaboration in context, leveraging feedback by iterating on results, and fostering balance by empowering people.

Zappos and Holacracy: No Holy Grail and No Silver Bullet!

January 12, 2014

By Si Alhir (@SAlhir), Brad Barton (@Brad_Barton), and Mark Ferraro (@mark4ro)

Zappos has had an exciting history — inception in 1999, growth from 1999 to 2009, acquisition by Amazon.com in 2009, and continued success.

In 2010, Zappos’ Tony Hseih’s Delivering Happiness (and more) book shared Zappos’ story and lessons learned from its journey so others could benefit from Zappos’ experience (@TonyHsieh). In 2008, Zappos championed Tribal Leadership (2008) and fueled CultureSync’s Tribal Leadership book and CultureSync‘s success (@CultureSync and @DaveLogan1). And now in 2014, Zappos is championing Holacracy and may ultimately fuel some “Holacracy book” and HolacracyOne‘s success (@HolacracyOne and @h1brian [Brian Robertson])!

While these techniques are valuable, there is no “holy grail” or “silver bullet” for success! As Tribal Leadership gained popularity, it often became the end versus a means to an end for far too many people! And now as Holacracy gains popularity, it may also often become the end versus a means to an end for far too many people! Additionally, as valuable as these techniques may be for Zappos, they may not necessarily be as valuable (in the same form) for other organizations!

Success and transforming to becoming more successful requires a journey of discovering what works best for an organization or enterprise, its various collective groups, and its individual people. Success and the transformative journey to become more successful cannot be reduced to a mere few bodies of knowledge or experience but may practically leverage the wisdom of many — for example, Judith E. Glaser (@CreatingWE) (WE-Centric Leadership and Conversational Intelligence (C-IQ)), Leandro Herrero (@LeandroEHerrero) (Viral Change), Peter Fuda (@PeterFuda) (Transformation and Leadership Framework/Model/Cycle), William Isaacs (Dialogue), Edgar Henry Schein (Humble Inquiry), David Rock (@davidrock101) (NeuroLeadership Institute), Barbara Trautlein (@btrautlein) (Change Intelligence (CQ)), Tim Kuppler (@TimKuppler) (Build the Culture Advantage), Carol Dweck (@mindsetworks and @Brainology) (Mindset), and many others (Human Leadership, Human Enterprise, etc.) — while embracing the imperative of being open versus closed in that journey of discovery around a community.

For example, CultureSync’s “process” and Holacracy’s “implementation” approaches are rooted in their perspectives and philosophies versus being open to discovering what may be best for their clients, etc.

To be clear, we are not against or for any perspective (Tribal Leadership and Holacracy (with roots in Sociocracy), etc.) but are for being agnostic and embracing an all-inclusive viewpoint, integrating relevant perspectives yet keeping the “human element” paramount (rooted in “human nature”), and embracing a journey (Conscious Agility (Conscious Capitalism + Business Agility = Antifragility) and A Brief Introduction) to discover what works for an organization or enterprise or community, its various collective groups, and its individual people — “The whole is greater than the sum of its parts” (Aristotle) and “Life is a journey, not a destination” (Ralph Waldo Emerson)!

Conscious Agility: A Brief Introduction

January 1, 2014

Brad BartonMark Ferraro, and I recently published Conscious Agility (Conscious Capitalism + Business Agility = Antifragility) — The purpose of this brief book is to introduce the conceptual underpinning of Conscious Agility but not fully elaborate or provide deep rich examples of its application.

While many business movements strictly adopt a single perspective — some focus on the so-called “softer” aspects (culture, leadership, etc.) while others focus on the so-called “harder” aspects (mechanics) of human dynamics — we have remained agnostic and embrace an all-inclusive viewpoint, integrating relevant perspectives yet keeping the “human element” paramount.

Not to discount any particular movement, but any myopic viewpoint often obscures reality and the importance of the “human element;” and while all business movements would readily argue that they don’t elevate their “particulars” over the “human element” — experience leads us to conclude otherwise!

Conscious Agility — which emerges from Conscious Capitalism, Business Agility, and Antifragility and our individual and collective experience fully rooted in decades of practice across many industry domains — is a design-thinking approach for business ecosystems that integrates awareness with intuition, orientation, and improvisation so that individuals and collectives may benefit from uncertainty, disorder, and the unknown.

A Conscious Agility initiative (cycle) as an approach focuses on “fundamental change” (or renewal), which is uniquely organic, simultaneous, and holistic in addressing a business perspective, organizational perspective, and culture perspective while being business or industry domain agnostic and technology agnostic, and may be combined with other approaches.

A Conscious Agility initiative is organized into a cycle of phases (which are generally sequential but may overlap), which are composed of conversation clusters, which are composed of conversations (that may occur in any order and as many times as needed to ensure the overall objectives of the phase are achieved and that are oriented towards addressing one or more questions that activates how people relate to one another and how people behave with one another). Conscious Agility relies on the following foundational concepts: Ecosystem, Stakeholder, Identity, Conversation, Values, Purpose, Value, Conversation Cluster, and Canvas (way of working together).

A Conscious Agility initiative cycle includes the following phases: Define, Create, and Refine.

Th following also explore Conscious Agility (and how it relates to other’s thoughts):

Foundational Concepts

Ecosystem

CA-01-Ecosystem-20140101

Stakeholder

CA-02-Stakeholder-20140101

Identity

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Values and Purpose

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Value

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Define Phase

Phase: Define — Foster awareness of stakeholders, envision an improved way of working together, and establish clarity around the initiative.

  • Conversation Cluster: Establish a Design Team — Launch the initiative with a team of individuals who represent the stakeholders within the ecosystem.
    • Conversation: Identify Stakeholders
    • Conversation: Build the Design Team
    • Conversation: Kick-off
  • Conversation Cluster: Discover a “minimal” Ecosystem Definition — Establish design team ownership of a path forward toward an improved way of working that is considerate of all stakeholders.
    • Conversation: Explore Today
    • Conversation: Explore Tomorrow
    • Conversation: Explore the Path from Today to Tomorrow
    • Conversation: Call to Action

 

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Create Phase

The Create phase includes the following conversation clusters and conversations:

Phase: Create — Achieve greater awareness, intuition, orientation, and improvisation by evolving the ecosystem; enacting shared experiences, while also integrating stakeholders.

  • Conversation Cluster: Enact Experiences — Exercise and evolve the new way of working.
    • Conversation: Examine Experiences
    • Conversation: Refine the Canvas
  • Conversation Cluster: Integrate Stakeholders — Exercise and evolve a new way of organizing.
    • Conversation: Explore how best to Organize
    • Conversation: Organize and Refine

 

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Refine Phase

The Refine phase includes the following conversation clusters and conversations:

Phase: Refine — Ensure stakeholders have sufficiently evolved the ecosystem to nurture continued success, allowing for the initiative to draw to closure.

  • Conversation Cluster: Embrace Experiences —Ensure that the new way of working is embraced by all stakeholders and reflects stakeholder experiences within the ecosystem.
    • Conversation: Examine Experiences
    • Conversation: Embody Canvas
  • Conversation Cluster: Nurture Stakeholders — Ensure that the ecosystem has fully integrated the new way of organizing and is nurturing all stakeholders.
    • Conversation: Explore how best to Nurture
    • Conversation: Nurture and Refine

 

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Conscious Agility in Practice

With this conceptual underpinning of Conscious Agility, we encourage practice to continue to inform its evolution.

Visit http://www.ConsciousAgility.com for more.

Conscious Agility and Mindsets & Action

January 1, 2014

Carol Dweck‘s (@mindsetworks and @BrainologyMindset: The New Psychology of Success focuses on “the power of people’s beliefs” and how “the view you adopt for yourself profoundly affects the way you lead your life.”

Based on our experience working with clients, and Artful Transformation and Conscious Agility (with co-authors Brad Barton and Mark Ferraro), I was very intrigued! While Mindset focuses more-so on the mindset of an individual, how does one approach the mindset of a collective (group, team, organization or enterprise, etc.) — that is, many individual mindsets and their shared mindset!

Mindsets: Fixed or Growth

Mindset starts by exploring people’s abilities and suggests (based on research) that “there were two meanings to ability, not one: a fixed ability that needs to be proven, and a changeable ability that can be developed through learning.”

When you enter a mindset, you enter a new world. In one world — the world of fixed traits — success is about proving you’re smart or talented. Validating yourself. In the other — the world of changing qualities — it’s about stretching yourself to learn something new. Developing yourself.

Mindset then suggests: “You have a choice. Mindsets are just beliefs. They’re powerful beliefs, but they’re just something in your mind, and you can change your mind.”

Mindset distinguishes between a fixed mindset (“fixed traits”) and growth mindset (“changing qualities”):

Believing that your qualities are carved in stone — the fixed mindset — creates an urgency to prove yourself over and over. If you have only a certain amount of intelligence, a certain personality, and a certain moral character — well, then you’d better prove that you have a healthy dose of them. It simply wouldn’t do to look or feel deficient in these most basic characteristics.

There’s another mindset in which these traits are not simply a hand you’re dealt and have to live with, always trying to convince yourself and others that you have a royal flush when you’re secretly worried it’s a pair of tens. In this mindset, the hand you’re dealt is just the starting point for development. This growth mindset is based on the belief that your basic quality are things you can cultivate through your efforts.

Mindset summarizes the fixed mindset with a diagram created by Nigel Holmes (@nigelblue) entitled Two Mindsets:

Fixed Mindset
(Intelligence is static)

Leads to a desire to look smart and therefore a tendency to . . .

  • Challenges: . . . avoid challenges
  • Obstacles: . . . get defensive or give up easily
  • Effort: . . . see effort as fruitless or worse
  • Criticism: . . . ignore useful negative feedback
  • Success of other: . . . feel threatened by the success of others

As a result, they may plateau early and achieve less than their full potential.

Mindset summarizes the growth mindset with a diagram created by Nigel Holmes (@nigelblue) entitled Two Mindsets:

Growth Mindset
(Intelligence can be developed)

Leads to a desire to learn and therefore a tendency to . . .

  • Challenges: . . . embrace challenges
  • Obstacles: . . . persist in the face of setbacks
  • Effort: . . . see effort as the path to mastery
  • Criticism: . . . learn from criticism
  • Success of other: . . . find lessons and inspiration in the success of others

As a result, they reach ever-higher levels of achievement.

Carol Dweck explores MindsetsMindsets and Achievement, and Mindsets and Change where she identifies “FOUR simple steps to being changing your mindset”:

Step 1. Learn to hear your fixed mindset “voice.”

Step 2. Recognize that you have a choice.

Step 3. Talk back to it with a growth mindset voice.

Step 4. Take the growth mindset action.

Again, while Mindset focuses more-so on the mindset of an individual, how does one approach the mindset of a collective (group, team, organization or enterprise, etc.) — that is, many individual mindsets and their shared mindset! Conscious Agility!

Conscious Agility

Conscious Agility — which emerges from Conscious Capitalism, Business Agility, and Antifragility and our individual and collective experience fully rooted in decades of practice across many industry domains — is a design-thinking approach for business ecosystems that integrates awareness with intuition, orientation, and improvisation so that individuals and collectives may benefit from uncertainty, disorder, and the unknown.

See Conscious Agility: A Brief Introduction for more information.

Mindsets and Conscious Agility

While many who talk about mindsets quote Zig Ziglar, both Mindset and Conscious Agility focus on Being (mindset) and Doing (action).

To Do is to Be. – Friedrich Nietzsche

To Be is to Do. – Immanuel Kant

You have to Be before you can Do and Do before you can Have. – Zig Ziglar

Conscious Agility’s notion of stakeholders “being a part of an ecosystem” generally relates to Mindset’s (mindset or being, step 1, 2, and 3) and Conscious Agility’s notion of stakeholders “doing something within the ecosystem” generally relates to Mindset’s (action or doing, step 4). Furthermore, Conscious Agility stresses that “stakeholder identity is central to how stakeholders are being a part of an ecosystem and doing something within the ecosystem” and that “identity encapsulates awareness and ownership”. Conscious Agility’s notion of identity and its awareness aspect relates to Mindset’s (mindset or being, step 1, 2, and 3) and ownership aspect relates to Mindset’s (action or doing, step 4).

At a macro level, Conscious Agility’s Define phase includes Mindset’s step 1, 2, and 3; and Conscious Agility’s Create and Refine phases relates to Mindset’s step 4.

At a micro level, Conscious Agility’s Examine Experiences conversation relates to Mindset’s step 4. In the Create phase’s Enact Experiences conversation cluster and in the Refine phase’s Embrace Experiences conversation cluster, “the stakeholders’ ability to intuit, orient, and improvise is embodied and integrated in these experiences” — that is, action (doing).

At a micro level, Conscious Agility’s Refine the Canvas conversation (Create phase’s Enact Experiences conversation cluster) and Embody Canvas conversation (Refine phase’s Embrace Experiences conversation cluster) relate to Mindset’s steps 1, 2, and 3 — that is mindset (being).

At a micro level, Conscious Agility’s Organize and Refine conversation (Create phase’s Integrate Stakeholders conversation cluster) and Nurture and Refine conversation (Refine phase’s Nurture Stakeholders conversation cluster) relate to Mindset’s steps 4, 1, 2, and 3 — that is action (doing) and mindset (being).

At a “nano level,” each individual involved in a Conscious Agility journey continuously experiences Mindset’s steps 1, 2, 3, and 4.

Fundamentally, Mindset and Conscious Agility are readily aligned around core concepts and human nature — and are both discovered in practiceWhile Mindset focuses more-so on the mindset of an individual, Conscious Agility focuses on both the individual and collective (group, team, organization or enterprise, etc.)!

Highly encourage all “practitioners” in this space to visit http://www.mindsetonline.com and http://ConsciousAgility.com to learn more!

Conscious Agility and Change Intelligence

January 1, 2014

Barbara A. Trautlein‘s (@btrautlein) Change Intelligence: Use the Power of CQ to Lead Change That Sticks focuses on people “struggling with the process of organizational change” and offers “a simple yet powerful model for change leadership.”

Based on our experience working with clients, and Artful Transformation and Conscious Agility (with co-authors Brad Barton and Mark Ferraro), I was very intrigued!

Catalysts or Alchemists

For decades, I struggled with naming / labeling those with the quintessential characteristics for “causing” or “activating” fundamental change or transformation. Ultimately, I embraced “Catalyst” (dictionary, wikipedia, etymology) or “Alchemist” (dictionary, wikipediaetymology).

Likewise, I consistently recognized the characteristics of catalysts/alchemists, including their ability to strategize, execute, champion, manage, facilitate, coach, and adapt while fundamentally evolving. While many people focusing on human potential, leadership, culture, strategy, etc. embraced the labels of “coach” and “coaching,” I subtly continued to embrace the labels of “catalyst” and “catalyzing” yet still used the more common vernacular of “coach” and “coaching” (or “transforming”).

Furthermore, I consistently recognized the orientation of catalysts/alchemists, which unified three forces: human nature, being, and doing. Again, while many embraced a more-soft “way of being” with an emphasis on mindset and many others embraced a more-hard “way of doing” with an emphasis on behavior, I subtly continued to embrace an integrated orientation rooted in “the catalyst manual/guide.”

I was introduced to the catalyst manual/guide very early in life. While I have leveraged various translations (from the early-1900s to the mid-1960s) of the manual/guide throughout the years, one translation (published in 2001) emerged and remains paramount! Furthermore, given the openness of the manual/guide. I have integrated and leveraged various other paradigms, perspectives, models, theories, etc. with the manual/guide throughout the years.

Undoubtedly, in a world of constant change, every act is transformative (or every act is an act of transformation or change) — to activate human potential and actualize an impact based on some intent! If you are a product manager, project manager, director, executive, team members, or take on any other role, you transform your energy and other’s energy to actualize an impact based on some intent.

Furthermore, if you shy away from the catalyst manual/guide because of the word “war,” you have sadly missed the point — The Art of War (Sun Tzu) is about human nature!

Change Intelligence

Discovering Change Intelligence (when it was published in 2013) was refreshing! To say the least — not only is Change Intelligence grounded in practice, but it provides a model that unifies many aspects of being a Catalyst or Alchemist (change leader/change agent). Anyone who is serious about the business of “change” or “transformation” related to leadership, culture, strategy, etc. can’t be without Change Intelligence! Not only does Change Intelligence offer “a simple yet powerful model for change leadership” but a simple yet powerful model for leadership (in general)!

Change Leadership & Change Management

Change Intelligence readily distinguishes between change leadership and change management.

It is possible for change to result in bottom-line business benefits as well as empowerment for individual employees — if it is led effectively. And that’s a big “if.” So often, change is led ineffectively, without an understanding of how we can optimize ourselves to be the best change leaders possible. That’s why I’ve developed my original, proprietary system for developing what I call “change intelligence,” or CQ.

The CQ System is a simple yet powerful model for change leadership.

Let’s draw a distinction between change leadership and change management . . . CQ is about diagnosing and developing your capacity to lead change — in other words, it’s about change leadership. Change management, on the other hand, is a set of techniques that you, the change leaders, can apply to a change process.

As change leaders, we pick and choose the change management approaches and techniques to bring to bear on a change situation. CQ will help you as a change leader identity which change management tools you tend to gravitate toward based on your style — and which you may tend to overuse or, conversely, overlook.

Awareness, Acceptance, Adaptation, and Action

Change Intelligence emphasizes that we must “understand and change ourselves first” before we can “lead others to change;” and how this establishes the bridge from awareness to action.

When people talk about change, they often fixate on the need to “overcome resistance.” That puts the focus squarely on others — as if it’s the leader’s job to do something to or in spite of someone else. But it’s not others that stand between you and leading positive, pervasive change. We must understand and change ourselves first; only then can we lead others to change.

Actually, to correct myself, a subtle distinction: it’s not about changing ourselves, it’s about changing our behaviors. It’s about adapting our styles, not fundamentally changing who we are. It’s about remaining true to ourselves so we can become more effective as leaders. Change starts with awareness, moves to acceptance, and then continues to adaptation and action.

Change Intelligence emphasizes that there are many organizational transformation models and approaches, and its not that they are wrong or useless, but incomplete in that they don’t sufficiently focus on a change leader’s awareness of their leadership style and how it must be adapted to be optimally effective.

We know a lot about organizational transformation. For over two decades, authors have written hundreds of books on change management.

With all this knowledge and all these methodologies, why do 70 percent or more of major change initiatives fail? It’s not that any of these models or tools are wrong or useless — they’re just incomplete.

Successful transformations require more than book knowledge and theory, regardless of how sage and vetted the advice might be. To lead change, change leaders must know themselves.

Change intelligence, or CQ, is the awareness of one’s own change leadership style and the ability to adapt one’s style to be optimally effective in leading change across a variety of situations. [from "change as something we 'do' to others" to "change is something we do 'with' (or 'for') others"]

The CQ System I’ve developed enables change leaders to diagnose their change intelligence, equips them with applied developmental strategies, and shows them how to be powerful agents of transformation.

Leadership Tendencies

Change Intelligence emphasizes that change leaders have a basic leadership tendency (Heart, Head, and Hands).

The CQ Systems starts with the fact that each change leader has a basic tendency to lead with his or her Heart (Affective/heartset for “who”), Head (Cognitive/mindset for “why” and “what”), Hands (Behaviors/skillset for “how”), or some combination of the three. If you lead mainly from the Heart, you connect with people emotionally (I want it!). If you lead from the Head, you connect with people cognitively (I get it!). And if you lead from the Hands, you connect with people behaviorally (I can do it!). Depending on your natural inclination toward one of these, you have your own set of talents and areas to improve:

  • Leads Change from the Heart
    • Style: Engaging, caring, people-oriented
    • Strength: Motivating and supportive coach
    • Developmental Opportunities: May neglect to revisit overall change goals and not devote attention to the specific tactics of the change process
  • Leads Change from the Head
    • Style: Strategic, futuristic, purpose-oriented
    • Strength: Inspirational and big picture visionary
    • Developmental Opportunities: May leave others behind wanting to move sooner than people are ready for and lacking detailed planning and follow-through
  • Leads Change from the Hands
    • Style: Efficient, tactical, process-oriented
    • Strength: Playful and systematic executer
    • Developmental Opportunities: May lose sight of the big picture and devalue team dynamics and individuals’ emotions

It is not inherently better or worse to focus on the Heart or the Head or the Hands. However, the effectiveness of a change leadership style shifts in different scenarios depending on the type of change occurring, the business objective, the organizational culture, the people involved, and many other factors.

Of course, no one leads completely from the Heart, or Head, or Hands. Each of us is a blend of all three, and a small percentage of people do lead with all three with equal savvy. But most of us tend to rely primarily on one or two of these aspects as we lead through change.

Many people are unaware of their dominant aspect (or aspects), and of the impact their leadership style has on the change initiatives they lead. But the effect of how you lead during change is significant — overreliance on the Heart, Head, or Hands to the detriment of the other aspects can alienate the people around you and limit your success. Fortunately, we can all build our capacity to use all three aspects and adapt our change leadership style to be more effective in any situation.

As a psychologist, I know change starts with us as change leaders. and to lead change, we need all three tools in our tools bag: to start with the heart, engage with the brain, and help the hands so to get moving in positive, new directions.

The intent of this book is to help you become aware of your change leadership style, accept your strengths and weaknesses, and start to build your CQ to catalyze powerful change in your career, team, and organization.

Notice that leading with the Heart is people-oriented and involves motivating and supporting people.

Notice that leading with the Head is purpose-oriented and involves an inspirational perspective.

Notice that leading with the Hands is process-oriented and involves a systematic perspective.

Notice that the leadership tendencies are all necessary for success.

Leadership Styles

Change Intelligence emphasizes that the basic leadership tendencies (Heart, Head, and Hands) form a number of change leader styles where each style is a mix of these tendencies.

Of course, none of us leads only, all the time, in every instance with the Head or Heart or Hands. We are each a blend of all three. It is this unique combination that represents our change leader style.

Each style indicates a different mix of Head, Heart, and Hands:

  • If you’re a Coach, you’re all about Heart. You love engaging your colleagues whenever you get a chance, and you find great reward in supporting the people around you as you all move through a change process.
  • If you’re a Visionary, you are the one who’s always looking forward to an inspiring future. Thanks to your Head focus, you have a gift for seeing opportunity and planning for new situations, and you tend to get excited about what lies on the other side of a change.
  • If you’re an Executer, you focus primarily on the Hands. You like to get things done, and people know they can rely on you to not just talk but take action. Often your execution is backed up by comprehensive, step-by-step plans.
  • If you’re a Champion, you use a combined strength in Head and Heart to get people pumped about change. Like a Visionary, you see abundant possibilities for the future and, adding the people skills of a Coach to the mix, you’re able to energize and excite your colleagues as you all work to bring about change.
  • If you’re a Driver, you’re strong on both Head and Hands. You see an enticing vision before you, and you use your executional abilities to drive toward that vision, laying out clear strategies and tactics along the way.
  • If you’re a Facilitator, you focus on the specific people and specific activities you need to support on a day-to-day basis to lead the change, thanks to your strong Heart and Hands capabilities. You know the tasks that need to be accomplished to make measurable progress, and you succeed in motivating others to work together on those tasks.
  • If you’re an Adapter, you’re about even on Head, Heart, and Hands. You can employ all three approaches as necessary, and you’re generally flexible, politically savvy, and willing to collaborate with others.

[The figure] depicts the relationships between the seven change leader styles through their positions on a triangle.

CQ-2014010100

Notice that the leadership styles form a integrated whole.

Change Intelligence further explores the leadership styles and their strengths and blind spots.

The Coach

  • The Coach’s Motto: To lead change, lead the people. Start with the heart.
  • Leaders with the Coach style of change leadership are defined by their orientation to people.

The Visionary

  • The Visionary’s Motto: Onward and upward toward new horizons! Another mountain to climb, another world to conquer!
  • The Visionary is a goal-directed leader who puts the vision, mission, and objectives of a change before all else.

The Executer

  • The Executer’s Motto: Plan the work and work the plan.
  • Executers are, above all, task focused.

The Champion

  • The Champion’s Motto: Together we can make it happen.
  • Champions excel at rallying people around a change goal.

The Driver

  • The Driver’s Motto: Just do it! Get’er done!
  • Drivers are all about results — they hunger to achieve the objectives of the change initiative.

The Facilitator

  • The Facilitator’s motto: I’m here to help! Lean on me.
  • Facilitators excel at Heart and Hands, and some say this is the best of all possible combinations, because they emphasize both task and process — they make change happen and care about how it happens.

The Adapter

  • The Adapter’s Motto: It looks exciting. Let’s all try it!
  • Adapters exist at the crossroads between Head, Heart, and Hands.

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Notice that the leadership styles integrate the Heart or people, Head or purpose, and Hands or process.

Conscious Agility

Conscious Agility — which emerges from Conscious Capitalism, Business Agility, and Antifragility and our individual and collective experience fully rooted in decades of practice across many industry domains — is a design-thinking approach for business ecosystems that integrates awareness with intuition, orientation, and improvisation so that individuals and collectives may benefit from uncertainty, disorder, and the unknown.

See Conscious Agility: A Brief Introduction for more information.

Change Intelligence and Conscious Agility

Conscious Agility’s Stakeholders generally relates to Change Intelligence’s Heart (people), Conscious Agility’s notion of stakeholders “being a part of an ecosystem” generally relates to Change Intelligence’s Head (being and purpose), and Conscious Agility’s notion of stakeholders “doing something within the ecosystem” generally relates to Change Intelligence’s Hands (doing and process). Furthermore, Conscious Agility stresses that “stakeholder identity is central to how stakeholders are being a part of an ecosystem and doing something within the ecosystem” and that “identity encapsulates awareness and ownership”. Conscious Agility’s notion of identity relates to Change Intelligence’s awareness, acceptance, adaptation, and action.

Conscious Agility’s Define phase “Discover a ‘minimal’ Ecosystem Definition” conversation cluster focuses on Change Intelligence‘s leadership tendencies (Heart, Head, and Hands). Furthermore, throughout Conscious Agility’s Define, Create, and Refine phases, the Design Team of catalysts (among others) use the leadership styles.

Conscious Agility’s Create phase “Enact Experiences” conversation cluster focuses on Change Intelligence’s Heart and Hands leadership tendencies — that is, bridging between people and process, or fostering people’s awareness of process through action.

Conscious Agility’s Create phase “Integrate Stakeholders” conversation cluster focuses on Change Intelligence’s Heart and Head leadership tendencies — that is, bridging between people and purpose, or fostering people’s awareness of purpose through action.

Conscious Agility’s Refine phase “Embrace Experiences” conversation cluster focuses on Change Intelligence’s Heart and Hands leadership tendencies — that is, ensuring the bridging between people and process after considering purpose.

Conscious Agility’s Refine phase “Nurture Stakeholders” conversation cluster focuses on Change Intelligence‘s Heart and Head leadership tendencies — that is, ensuring the bridging between people and purpose after considering process.

Conscious Agility’s secret ingredient is to be “agnostic and embrace an all-inclusive viewpoint, integrating relevant perspectives yet keeping the ‘human element’ paramount” — all discovered in practice.

Fundamentally, Change Intelligence and Conscious Agility are readily aligned around core concepts and human nature — and are both discovered in practice!

Highly encourage all “practitioners” in this space to visit http://www.changecatalysts.com and http://ConsciousAgility.com to learn more!

Conscious Agility and Build The Culture Advantage

December 28, 2013

Tim Kuppler (@TimKuppler) gratuitously honored my request for an advanced / review copy of Build the Culture Advantage (with co-authors Ted Garnett and Tom Morehead and with contributing authors Edward Marshall and Scott Beilke).

Based on our experience working with clients, and Artful Transformation and Conscious Agility (with co-authors Brad Barton and Mark Ferraro), I was very intrigued!

Being somewhat cautious (if not suspicious) of so-called gurus and thought leaders championing their so-called wisdom on leadership, culture, strategy, transformation, etc. through keynotes and executive coaching focused on the “soft stuff” without a more deliberate and holistic approach rooted in “practice” that more-so integrates the “soft stuff” and “hard stuff,” I was open-minded but somewhat cautious in approaching Build the Culture Advantage! To say the least — Build the Culture Advantage does not disappoint!

Build the Culture Advantage

Build the Culture Advantage is a guide about “building a performance culture,” offering:

  • A framework for evaluating the operating drivers of your current culture and a best practice guide for leveraging them to improve performance
  • A complete roadmap for major efforts to implement a performance culture

The emphasis on culture and performance is further elaborated:

Culture is a powerful force but it remains an elusive or mysterious subject. It’s been easier to tackle the more concrete subjects of strategy, talent management, or even leadership. There are plenty of improvement frameworks for those disciplines. Unfortunately there aren’t many, if any, simple, logical, and common-sense frameworks for effectively leveraging and aligning the culture of an organization with a direct connection to performance. This work is focused on how to reinforce or adjust the primary systems, habits, and behaviors of an organization so they consistently support the core values and a clear vision for the future. It is possible to accelerate the culture learning curve and manage culture with a great deal of clarity, but leaders need a guide. They need a clear and customizable framework grounded in common-sense language and approaches that applies across all levels of any industry.

Build the Culture Advantage emphasizes that “there aren’t many, if any, simple, logical, and common-sense frameworks for effectively leveraging and aligning the culture of an organization with a direct connection to performance” and it explicitly identifies the need for a “clear and customizable framework grounded in common-sense language and approaches that applies across all levels of any industry.”

To that end, Build the Culture Advantage offers a Performance (Operating Drivers) Culture Framework, Culture Maturity Model, Culture Alignment Roadmap (Phases), and much more.

Conscious Agility

Conscious Agility — which emerges from Conscious Capitalism, Business Agility, and Antifragility and our individual and collective experience fully rooted in decades of practice across many industry domains — is a design-thinking approach for business ecosystems that integrates awareness with intuition, orientation, and improvisation so that individuals and collectives may benefit from uncertainty, disorder, and the unknown.

See Conscious Agility: A Brief Introduction for more information.

Build the Culture Advantage’s Performance Culture Framework  and Conscious Agility

The Performance (Operating Drivers) Culture Framework organizes operating drivers into four categories, two backbone and two additional.

  • Strategic and Financial Alignment [backbone] — the process and supporting structure of priorities and expectations required to align values, strategic priorities, goals, measures, and, most importantly, expected behavior with a clear vision for the future of the organization.
  • Motivation [backbone] — the connection of priorities and expectations to formal and informal systems to reinforce results and behavior. This includes base-level motivators like compensation and benefits, as well as management and peer recognition that leads to higher level motivators like pride and the individual sense of being able to make an “impact.”
  • Talent Management — the systems for developing and using the talent in the organization to realize the vision, priorities, and expectations.
  • Core Process Improvement — improvement of the primary systems the organization uses for managing work. This includes base management systems for monitoring and managing priorities and plans as well as core “operating” processes (sales, production, customer service, etc.).

The Strategic and Financial Alignment category of the Performance Culture Framework relates to Conscious Agility’s Purpose, Value, and Canvas (way of working together).

The Motivation category of the Performance Culture Framework relates to Conscious Agility’s Values and Canvas (way of working together).

The Talent Management category of the Performance Culture Framework relates to Conscious Agility’s Stakeholders and Canvas (way of working together).

The Core Process Improvement category of the Performance Culture Framework relates to Conscious Agility’s Canvas (way of working together).

Build the Culture Advantage’s Culture Maturity Model and Conscious Agility

The Culture Maturity Model organizes the framework around developing a performance culture (improvement levels) over time.

Culture Level 1: Reactive

  • Strategic and Financial Alignment:
    • Lack of clear priorities/goals & system for managing status & plans.
  • Core Process Improvement:
    • Major pain managing many core processes.
    • Negative impact on employees & customers.
  • Motivation:
    • Major trust issues & a break-down of communication.
  • Talent Management:
    • Ineffective or limited talent management systems.

Culture Level 2: Functional

  • Strategic and Financial Alignment:
    • Clear strategic priorities/goals & adequate system for managing status & plans.
  • Core Process Improvement:
    • Substantial pain managing some core processes.
    • Improvement clearly needed to reduce frustrations.
  • Motivation:
    • Foundation of trust & communication.
    • Basic management recognition but improvement needed.
  • Talent Management:
    • Limited application of effective team structures.
    • Basic competency development & performance management.

Culture Level 3: Collaborative

  • Strategic and Financial Alignment:
    • A motivating vision is effectively supported by collaborative priorities crossing functions or boundaries.
    • All levels understand financial drivers & supporting measures.
  • Core Process Improvement:
    • Effective core processes but streamlining opportunities remain.
    • Effective application of lean and/or other improvement tools.
  • Motivation:
    • Solid trust & communication systems.
    • Strong management recognition. Incentives at individual, team & organization levels.
  • Talent Management:
    • A hierarchy of teams exists.
    • Clear performance management with feedback from multiple sources.
    • Solid competency development aligned with priorities/goals.

Culture Level 4: High Performance:

  • Strategic and Financial Alignment:
    • Full Strategic Alignment with individuals, teams & the organization continually optimizing & innovating.
    • Financial drivers fully understood & clearly supported by relevant measures & goals at all levels.
  • Core Process Improvement:
    • Efficient, innovative & market-leading core processes are continuously improved.
    • Advanced application of lean or other progressive improvement tools.
  • Motivation:
    • Deep trust & open communication exists at all levels.
    • Motivation & enthusiasm evident at all levels. Employees know they make an impact.
  • Talent Management:
    • Effective collaboration & teams at all levels. New hire fit assessed through teams & other approaches.
    • Fully aligned talent management systems with progressive development for competencies, leadership & succession.

Because Conscious Ability does not propose a maturity model per se, the Reactive (level 1), Functional (level 2), Collaborative (level 3), and Higher Performance (level 4) levels of the Culture Maturity Model are not directly related to a maturity model in Conscious Agility; but just as the Culture Maturity Model levels are related to the Culture Alignment Roadmap phases, the levels are related to Conscious Agility’s phases.

Build the Culture Advantage’s Culture Alignment Roadmap and Conscious Agility

The Culture Alignment Roadmap (Phases) organizes the framework over time with an emphasis on implementation.

Phase 1, Build the Foundation, is focused on moving from Reactive (level 1) to Functional (level 2).

Phase 1 – Building the Foundation: Define your unique culture, clarify expectations and priorities, and align your systems to clearly support the top one to three priorities. Move to the functional stage as the organization learns the behavior necessary to build positive momentum as a team.

DEFINE

    1. Evaluate current culture & performance.
    2. Clarify your initial vision.
    3. Clarify values & expected behaviors.

ALIGN

    1. Clarify strategic priorities.
    2. Engage teams in defining & translating SMART goals.
    3. Clarify & track key measures.

MANAGE

    1. Maintain a management system for priorities / goals.
    2. Manage communication habits & routines.
    3. Build motivation throughout the process.

Phase 2, Expand the Approach, is focused on moving from Functional to Collaborative (level 3).

Phase 2 – Expand the Approach: Build on the concepts learned in Phase 1 to support a greater vision for the future with emphasis on highly effective collaboration and developing key supporting competencies.

  • Develop a greater vision.
  • Build a culture of collaboration.
  • Develop key competencies.
  • Refine your foundation & drive collaboration as you “expand the approach.”

Phase 3, Go Deep, is about moving from Collaborative to High Performance (level 4).

Phase 3 – Go Deep (for sustainable performance): Implement more advanced improvement approaches as a team that support the greater vision with innovation and speed. Manage the continual development of leaders, succession development, and hiring practices that emphasize cultural fit to embed changes in the culture over time to achieve sustainable performance improvement.

  • Leverage leadership development.
  • Focus succession development.
  • Acquire talent to fit your developing culture.
  • Refine your foundation & drive innovation as you “go deep.”

Phase 1 (Build the Foundation) of the Culture Alignment Roadmap relates to Conscious Agility’s Phase 1 (Define). The Define, Align, and Manage aspects of Phase 1 of the Culture Alignment Roadmap relate to Conscious Agility’s Phase 1 “Discover a ‘minimal’ Ecosystem Definition” conversation cluster, and is adapted to whatever extent is needed to progress into Phase 2.

Phase 2 (Expand the Approach) of the Culture Alignment Roadmap relates to Conscious Agility’s Phase 2 (Create) where both approaches focus on expansion atop of Phase 1.

Phase 3 (Go Deep (for sustainable performance)) of the Culture Alignment Roadmap relates to Conscious Agility’s Phase 3 (Refine) where both approaches focus on sustainability atop of Phase 1 and 2.

Build the Culture Advantage and Conscious Agility

Fundamentally, Build the Culture Advantage and Conscious Agility are readily aligned around core concepts and human nature — and are both discovered in practice!

Highly encourage all “practitioners” in this space to visit http://the-culture-advantage.com and http://ConsciousAgility.com to learn more!

The Peter Drucker Way

December 21, 2013

Bruce Rosenstein‘s (@brucerosenstein) Create Your Future the Peter Drucker Way: Developing and Applying a Forward-Focused Mindset distills “Drucker’s secrets about the future, in part by determining the approach he himself took.”

Peter Drucker, who was known as “the father of modern management,” had a way of thinking and writing about, and acting on, the future that was integral to his personal and professional life. He developed a profound central insight, that the future must be created day by day, person by person, rather than be left to chance or fate. I contend that his future-focused mindset was a key factor that led him to the highest possible professional achievements.

The book organizes Drucker’s core beliefs about the future (future-oriented mindset) into a framework with 10 main elements.

Drucker’s approach to the future allowed for changing times and different eras.

My study of Drucker’s teaching and writing about the future has led me to distill and delineate a number of elements, outlined below and throughout the book, that are crucial to understanding how he approached the future.

Whatever is happening in your personal or work situation can be matched against these elements. Not all of the elements will apply every time. But if you think of challenges that lie ahead in terms of these elements, I believe they will provide you with a guide to a brighter stronger future. . . . consider them for both individuals and organizations.

Think in terms of transformations when considering the Drucker future-oriented mindset. We are all aiming to make something different (and ideally better) of ourselves and our organizations, all the time. It is somehow easier to deal with constant, unrelenting change, risk, and uncertainty if transformation is one of our primary goals.

  • Mindset. The best way to approach the future is to keep it in mind as you go about your daily life and work.
  • Uncertainty. The future is essentially unknown/unknowable, uncertain, and unpredictable. You can’t assume that it will be similar to today.
  • Creation. Despite and because of its unpredictability, the future must be built and created.
  • Inevitability. Accept that a certain amount of the future has, as Drucker put it, “already happened,” because of the inevitable coming effects of events that have already taken place.
  • Present moment. The future unfolds based on and because of the thoughts, actions, choices, commitments, and decisions that you are making right now.
  • Change. People and organizations must accept this as normal and ongoing and should be organized for change, driven by change leaders/change agents.
  • Reflection. The observations you make about potential futures must include the implications for your personal life and work situation.
  • Remove/improve. The future is created by systematically stopping what is no longer useful, while continually improving what remains. This represents the combination of systematic abandonment and kaizen, which will be described further below.
  • Innovation/entrepreneurship. Innovations in services, products, and processes are major drivers of creating the future. Entrepreneurs create valuable new enterprises for the future gain of society.
  • Risk. Continual change means challenges from disruptive technologies and disruptive businesses, as well as nonstop turbulence. Risk is ever-present, but doing nothing is oft en not helpful, either.

ThePeterDruckerWay20131221

Mindset, Uncertainty, and Creation

Mindset. The best way to approach the future is to keep it in mind as you go about your daily life and work.

The Mindset principle emphasizes that we must “consciously, intentionally, and deliberately think about the future.” Drucker emphasized that we must embrace “the future that has already happened” (past) while “making the future happen” (future).

Uncertainty. The future is essentially unknown/unknowable, uncertain, and unpredictable. You can’t assume that it will be similar to today.

The Uncertainty principle emphasizes that “no one can completely know what the future will bring,” it is “futile to make predictions, especially to make important decision based on those predictions,” and it’s about “embracing change, uncertainty, and doubt, rather than running away from them.” Drucker emphasized that the future “‘cannot be known'” and “‘it will be different from what exists now and from what we expect.'”

Creation. Despite and because of its unpredictability, the future must be built and created.

The Creation principle emphasizes “developing, on an ongoing basis, what you want to accomplish and work toward and how you are going to get there;” that is, “not putting off decisions and actions so far into the future that they lose all meaning.” Drucker emphasized that we must “create knowing that life will be uncertain, that there will always be risks, and that change is the norm.” Drucker explains that “‘there comes a point when the small steps of exploitation result in a major, fundamental change, that is, in something that is genuinely new and different.'”

Mindset, Uncertainty, and Creation form a macro framework for being future-oriented. Embracing this perspective, which is easier said than done, anchors us in a continuum wherein we can confront a paradoxical reality.

Inevitability and Present Moment

Inevitability. Accept that a certain amount of the future has, as Drucker put it, “already happened,” because of the inevitable coming effects of events that have already taken place.

The Inevitability principle emphasizes that “‘it is pointless to try to predict the future,'” but “looking at what has already happened ‘that will have predictable effects’.” Drucker emphasized that while “the future could not be predicted,” “the tools to know what the future might look like” is “what is happening now and has happend in the recent past.”

Present Moment. The future unfolds based on and because of the thoughts, actions, choices, commitments, and decisions that you are making right now.

The Present Moment principle emphasizes “that what makes the future happen is what you do today, in the present moment.” Drucker emphasized: “The future requires decision — now. It imposes risk — now. It requires action — now.” That is, this is the “chain of events necessary for the future to unfold.”

Inevitability and Present Moment form a micro framework for appreciating the past. Embracing this perspective ensures we appreciate the past relative to the future.

Change, Reflection, Remove/Improve, Innovation/Entrepreneurship, and Risk

Change. People and organizations must accept this as normal and ongoing and should be organized for change, driven by change leaders/change agents.

This principle emphasizes that “change is the natural order of things” and “you not only have to get used to it, but have to learn to thrive on it.” Drucker emphasized: “‘The most effective way to manage change successfully is to create it.'” “‘One cannot manage change. One can only be ahead of it.'” Furthermore, “‘to survive and succeed, every organization will have to turn itself into a change agent'” and “‘the point of becoming a change agent is that it changes the mind-set of the entire organization. Instead of seeing change as a threat, its people will come to consider it an opportunity.'” Furthermore, Drucker describes “a change leader as someone who ‘sees change as opportunity'” and “the leader ‘looks for change, knows how to find the right changes and knows how to make them effective both outside the organization and inside it.'”

Change is the central concept of a micro framework for appreciating the future. Embracing this perspective ensures we have the opportunity to thrive on change.

Reflection. The observations you make about potential futures must include the implications for your personal life and work situation.

This principle emphasizes that “reflection and discussion takes place before any decisions are made or actions taken.” Drucker emphasized “responsibility for converting change into opportunity” in a “competent, purposeful way, realizing its potential impact on many people.”

Remove/improve. The future is created by systematically stopping what is no longer useful, while continually improving what remains. This represents the combination of systematic abandonment and kaizen, which will be described further below.

This principle emphasizes “planned/systematic/organized abandonment.” Drucker emphasizes: “If you were not already doing a particular activity, would you start doing it now, based on your experience and results? If not, are you going to keep doing it?”

Innovation/entrepreneurship. Innovations in services, products, and processes are major drivers of creating the future. Entrepreneurs create valuable new enterprises for the future gain of society.

This principle emphasizes “change, either incremental change or more radical change.” Drucker emphasized: “Innovators change how we look at the world, what we buy, and what we no longer buy” while “entrepreneurs sense or create needs that consumer never knew they had” and both “make the future a different, better place from their creations, products, or services.” Furthermore, Drucker explains that “grafting innovation on to a traditional enterprise does not work,” that is, “if you always do things in a traditional way and are set in your ways, it is hard to become an innovative, entrepreneurial company or organization.”

Risk. Continual change means challenges from disruptive technologies and disruptive businesses, as well as nonstop turbulence. Risk is ever-present, but doing nothing is oft en not helpful, either.

This principle emphasizes “that, although making the future was highly risky, not trying to make the future was equally or more risky.”

Reflection, Remove/Improve, Innovation/Entrepreneurship, and Risk organized around the central concept of Change elaborate a micro framework for appreciating the future. Embracing this perspective fosters thriving by transforming change into opportunity.

Peter Drucker’s Wisdom

Today, where so many so-called gurus and thought leaders are in the business of conjuring-up or making-up and peddling so-called leadership, culture, strategy, etc. (among other) “models” and rhetoric in the name of “their wisdom” while sometimes barely considering the present and quite often completely neglecting the past, then furthermore becoming one-trick ponies for their so-called wisdom, Bruce Rosenstein’s Create Your Future the Peter Drucker Way: Developing and Applying a Forward-Focused Mindset is a very refreshing (can’t be emphasized enough!) reminder to such so-called gurus and thought leaders — in their quest to achieve greatness, be amazing, be excellent, achieve excellence or brilliancehack this-or-that, focus on “being” (or mindset) vs “doing” (or behavior) when you really need both, and whatever other such gimmickry that offers quick gratification but little lasting substance — of why Peter Drucker remains so influential.

Drucker was fond of saying that he looked out the window to see what was visible but unseen by many others.

Above all, the future must be created in a purposeful, meaningful way, by the actions people and organizations carry out each day.

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